Barefoot Shoe Misadventures

We’re quite the eco minded family. We are constantly striving to make better choices when we purchase anything;

  • Is it ethically made?
  • Is it sustainably made?
  • Are they plastic free or striving towards it?
  • What’s the company’s ethos?
  • What’s their packaging like?
  • What’s the impact on the environment?
  • How long will it last?
  • How much does it cost?

Overall we look at whether it’s worth investing in something more expensive than buying cheap and buying twice?

Well…

You’re not going to like this but we think it might all be bollocks!

We, like many others, have been lured in by conscious brands in targeted social media ads telling us what shoes we should be wearing, what shoes our kids should be wearing and we fell for it. We fell hard.

In the past 18 months we’ve bought over a dozen pairs of shoes from these eco minded and forward thinking brands and not a single pair has lasted..

In fact they’ve all spectacularly fallen apart within a few months.

More disappointingly each company we’ve dealt with is hard work too as their customer service is often slow and tedious and you lose the will to live before concluding a conversation. It’s very frustrating to see our hard earned pennies go straight in the bin within 6 months.

One of the unique selling points from one of these brands is that the kids shoes are meant to last; they’re specially designed to be able to passed down to a younger sibling or they could be sold on. It is extremely desirable. There are 3 kids in this house and the potential monetary savings for that alone as amazing…

… Well, we can’t comment on that, not in this house, not a single kids pair has lasted much longer than a school term and our boys aren’t even particularly hard on their shoes!

The soles have fallen off, the seams have split the top of the shoe has literally ripped open, we’ll not mention the laces or the hook and loop fastening that’s just come apart in their hands… not a single brand has delivered on a well made shoe.

They’re all just pretty bits of landfill essentially!

A positive from all this is that we all love walking barefoot, especially the kids – we have ALL noticed a difference in this respect, but we can’t continue to do this.

We simply can’t afford it and we can’t justify it either, not any more. This has got to be one of the most costly and wasteful decisions we’ve ever made. We tried, is the best we can say about this at the moment!

We know they’re supposed to made consciously with the environment in mind but if they can’t last even a year then what’s the point?

How is that better?

We’ve bought different styles, we’ve bought different sizes, we’ve sent shoes back, we’ve complained and exchanged and we’ve given them second chances.

No more.

We’re done.

Buying cheap may mean buying twice but that’ll still work out better overall than buying poor quality shoes off an Insta Ad just because it’s looks pretty in a square and some catchy tag line makes you think this is a good choice for the planet.

So, apologies for the negativity in this post but upon reflection our reasoning to invest in better shoes for us and our children has just overall been a poor life decision.

Emphasis on the word poor.

If anyone can recommend a barefoot friendly shoe brand that actually delivers a quality shoe that lasts more than a year, (or a school term) we’d love to hear from you!

Jo (& Mark)

TeamWorrall

💚

5 Comments

  1. Hey! What brands have you tried? I have used only barefoot shoes both for me and my toddler for a year and a half now and have had only positive experiences.

    I have bought shoes from Vivobarefoot, Wildling, Tadeevo, and Boty Luks and have encountered no problems in terms of quality so far. Same goes for my daughter’s shoes – bought from Bobux, Tikki (although I have seen negative feedback about them), Rose et Chocolat, Dotty Fish (slippers), Beda Boty, Mikk-Line (wellies), and Feelmax. (Her feet grew A LOT in the last 18 months, can you tell? :D)

    I would recommend this blog for great in-depth barefoot shoes reviews: https://baresteps.co.uk/

    Hopefully you will have better luck in the future! I really love all my barefoot shoes and firmly believe they are the best choice for healthy feet.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Thanks for the blog recommendation. Off for a nosey.

      Our house has gone through so many pairs of Vivos it’s unreal. They’re amazingly comfy but they fall apart in a few months.

      Bobux has a disappointing approach when it comes to marketing so I stopped buying from them 😂🙈

      Plae and Po-Zu have both fallen apart on us as well and have really bad CS.

      We love barefoot shoes and we’ve all noticed a difference it’s just trying to be brave and picking a brand to try next. It’s been such an expensive year for shoes I want to get it “right” 🙈 any ideas?!

      Tadeevo I’ve not heard of will give them a look, thanks xx

      Like

      1. Hi – really interesting article! Can I ask what you didn’t like bout Bobux’s ‘marketing approach’? I’ve not seen anything (but maybe I’m not on the right websites!) and always heard good things?

        Liked by 1 person

      2. It’s silly really, but they had this big gendered marketing campaign which I wasn’t a fan of. I’m getting quite fussy about where I buy stuff now and that was enough to put me off. Plus I tend to rebel instinctively when someone tells me I can’t do/have something 😂😂😂

        Boys shoes for boys in boy colours and girl shoes for girls in girl colours. 🙄

        We’ve just bought silver and pink shoes from plae because my son kept asking for pink shoes! I don’t agree that there are “boy” and “girl” colours. There are just COLOURS.

        They’re kids shoes at the end of the day. I just want a pair that will last until they’re outgrown. Be practical and be kind to their feet…. and the moon on a stick 😉

        Like

      3. Yes I totally agree – both my boys wear lots of pink. That’s strange though as lots of my friends like Bobux because of it being a unisex brand and because they don’t appear to buy it to the pink/blue stereotype – unlike some of the bigger high street brands on the market. Oh well glad you found something for you son!

        Like

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